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How Does President Trump's Immigration Executive Order Impact You?
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How Does President Trump's Immigration Executive Order Impact You?

01.30.17

On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order limiting the admission of refugees and nationals of certain countries into the United States. The Executive Order bars Syrian refugees from being admitted into the United States indefinitely and suspends all other refugee admissions for a 120-day period. The Executive Order also bars nationals from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the United States for a 90-day period.

Unclear language used in the Executive Order has caused significant confusion at airports and ports of entry regarding the admission of individuals from the designated countries listed above. But here is what we know now, which is subject to change:

The impact and scope of the Executive Order is still unclear, as protests and legal action have quickly emerged across the United States. As of this writing, multiple federal judges have issued rulings to partially block the Executive Order by stopping the federal government from removing refugees and individuals with valid visas. It is unclear how consistently the Executive Order and subsequent court rulings will be applied by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officers at airports and ports of entry nationwide.

Given the current uncertainty with how the Executive Order will be applied, we strongly advise employers to take the following steps to protect your foreign workers:

Please note that the current situation is very fluid and may change at any time.

This most recent executive action has demonstrated that the Trump Administration plans to move aggressively on immigration issues. There are predictions that future Executive Orders may address important employment-based immigration issues including reforming the eligibility criteria for F-1 STEM OPT extensions, eliminating H-4 employment authorization for H-1B dependents, increasing work site inspections/audits, and significantly altering the H-1B visa allocation process.

On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order limiting the admission of refugees and nationals of certain countries into the United States. The Executive Order bars Syrian refugees from being admitted into the United States indefinitely and suspends all other refugee admissions for a 120-day period. The Executive Order also bars nationals from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the United States for a 90-day period.

Unclear language used in the Executive Order has caused significant confusion at airports and ports of entry regarding the admission of individuals from the designated countries listed above. But here is what we know now, which is subject to change:

The impact and scope of the Executive Order is still unclear, as protests and legal action have quickly emerged across the United States. As of this writing, multiple federal judges have issued rulings to partially block the Executive Order by stopping the federal government from removing refugees and individuals with valid visas. It is unclear how consistently the Executive Order and subsequent court rulings will be applied by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol officers at airports and ports of entry nationwide.

Given the current uncertainty with how the Executive Order will be applied, we strongly advise employers to take the following steps to protect your foreign workers:

Please note that the current situation is very fluid and may change at any time.

This most recent executive action has demonstrated that the Trump Administration plans to move aggressively on immigration issues. There are predictions that future Executive Orders may address important employment-based immigration issues including reforming the eligibility criteria for F-1 STEM OPT extensions, eliminating H-4 employment authorization for H-1B dependents, increasing work site inspections/audits, and significantly altering the H-1B visa allocation process.



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